Andy Jaros

Andy Jaros

VP Sales, Flex Logix

MCUs come in a broad range of flavors, meaning you can pick the best one for the application with the right performance, feature set, peripherals, memory, and software programmability. So, then, why do many systems also use FPGAs next to the MCUs? Usually, it’s because there’s not a “perfect” MCU for their application. MCUs by definition are built to be generic for a wide variety of applications, or in the case of applications specific standard parts (ASSPs), targeting particular market segments. Customization is done with software. FPGAs come into play where embedded CPUs can’t execute the required workload efficiently and some level of hard logic is needed to process proprietary algorithms, support unique interface requirements or enable future system upgradability.